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Gossip – LOVE it or HATE it? It has its pluses & minuses.

The origins of the term gossip some say began with Shakespeare (who was singlehandedly responsible for a great number of words we have in English today), while others think it has roots in the French language. Personally, I think there must have been a term for this knocking around for hundreds even thousands of years.Continue reading “Gossip – LOVE it or HATE it? It has its pluses & minuses.”

Have you ever been short of cash?

Haven’t most people at some point been short of money? Could be for any number of reasons, the actual reasons rarely matter, what is important to people at the time they’re experiencing a lack in funds is that they have NO MONEY. It can be embarrassing, awkward, even humiliating. People can and do feel aContinue reading “Have you ever been short of cash?”

Seasons Greetings (Happy Holidays) Let’s look at Alcohol Idioms…

Now there will be a few (just kidding, they’ll be more likely millions!) of people around the world today who might be feeling a little out of sorts, off colour, not quite their best, under par, peaky, queasy, et, etc… after their Christmas festivities… All the above are words we can use to describe howContinue reading “Seasons Greetings (Happy Holidays) Let’s look at Alcohol Idioms…”

Speaking exercise (forming and giving opinions) Intermediate/advanced

I like recycling and I decided to reuse an idea from an older post to form this one. In “33 ways to say walk” you practiced your past participles. Well, sticking with a ‘walking’ theme, please read on… Now many years ago (too many in fact) when I was an undergraduate, I had a friendContinue reading “Speaking exercise (forming and giving opinions) Intermediate/advanced”

Zero Conditionals in English Grammar

When you are writing or speaking and you want to convey an idea of something that usually, generally or always happens, use the zero conditional. This conditional is used, for example, to talk about scientific facts. The formula for the zero conditional is: if/when + simple present (1st clause) + simple present or an imperativeContinue reading “Zero Conditionals in English Grammar”

Indefinite articles again…

So why are there 2 indefinite articles? (You’re wondering) Well, that’s easy-ish… we use ‘a’ before adjectives or nouns whose first letter is a consonant and we use ‘an’ before adjectives or nouns whose first letter is a vowel. And if that was all there was to it, this would be the end of thisContinue reading “Indefinite articles again…”

Indefinite articles

Well in a previous post we looked at the English definite article ‘the’. In this post I want to go over the English indefinite article a/an. Quick re-cap: We use ‘the’ to talk about something known to the speaker and the listener. However, when discussing something(s) unknown we use a/an instead. Why? Have you seenContinue reading “Indefinite articles”

Definite article – THE

This small but sometimes confusing word is used with nouns. These nouns can be something already mentioned in a conversation or known, something unique or something the speaker/writer has chosen to mention specifically. WE NEVER USE THE FOR GENERIC THINGS OR SOMETHING THAT HAS NOT BEEN MENTIONED BEFORE. The other day I was watching anContinue reading “Definite article – THE”

Everyday English Expressions

It’s time to inject a little break from the grammar, so I thought I’d write about a few British English expressions using the word ‘get’. Some of them may also be used in other English-speaking countries and maybe not. I guess you’ll have to listen out for them wherever you are or better still, tryContinue reading “Everyday English Expressions”

Cat Idioms

Something I sometimes said when I was a high school teacher in the UK was “it’s like herding cats trying to get my year 9s to do even the simplest task on time” The underlined part is the idiom and means = almost an impossibility (can you imagine trying to herd a lot of cats?Continue reading “Cat Idioms”

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