Valentine’s Day – How did it begin?

I have two stories that might help answer that question and believe it or not, both tales are firmly rooted in Ancient Rome. One describes the typical kind of love story we frequently watch today in cinemas across the globe. The only difference being instead of it ending all happy-ever-after as Hollywood films like PrettyContinue reading “Valentine’s Day – How did it begin?”

Prefixes (intermediate)

Change the list of words below into their opposites by using the following prefixes: un- in- dis- il- im- ir- Remember to always learn new vocabulary with their opposites (antonyms) and a bunch of synonyms too. That’s how you can help yourself expand your vocabulary quickly. There are plenty more words that would fit intoContinue reading “Prefixes (intermediate)”

Third Conditional in English Grammar

This conditional is sometimes called the UNREAL PAST. It is used for discussing things in the past that did not happen AND because they are in the past already, they can never be changed and are thus impossibilities. You remember the last one, 2nd conditional, the one I told you was my favourite? At leastContinue reading “Third Conditional in English Grammar”

Second Conditionals in English Grammar

Now this is the fun one! This is my favourite because you can really let your imagination go crazy! Why? Because this conditional is all about things that are impossible or imaginary. For example, if I won the lottery, I would buy the Orient Express and live on it permanently. It’s a conditional for dreamersContinue reading “Second Conditionals in English Grammar”

First Conditionals in English Grammar

In a previous post we looked as zero conditionals and in this one we will cover 1st conditionals. The two share a few similarities; they have two clauses, clauses can be swapped over, when the word if is in the middle of a sentence you can omit the comma, the if- clause sets the sceneContinue reading “First Conditionals in English Grammar”

Zero Conditionals in English Grammar

When you are writing or speaking and you want to convey an idea of something that usually, generally or always happens, use the zero conditional. This conditional is used, for example, to talk about scientific facts. The formula for the zero conditional is: if/when + simple present (1st clause) + simple present or an imperativeContinue reading “Zero Conditionals in English Grammar”

Infinitives or Gerunds?

Try out the following exercises for more practice with gerunds and infinitives, see if you can fill the gaps correctly. And yes, every example will be featuring cats with either an -ing or an infinitive (with/without TO) Mia wasn’t used __________ out of her new metal bowl. (EAT) The vet advised me __________ Oscar backContinue reading “Infinitives or Gerunds?”

Gerunds

Gerunds are words formed by adding -ing to the ends of verbs (walk+ing, eating, shopping, writing and so on). Gerunds turn verbs into nouns. In sentences gerunds can have one of several functions: FUNCTION 1 Gerunds can be used as the subject when it is a noun and it is the action described by theContinue reading “Gerunds”

Relative clauses and relative pronouns

Relative pronouns make it very clear which particular person or thing is being discussed e.g. Jackie O is our bright white cat who gave birth to triplets last year. Relative clauses also give more information about things or people e.g. Jackie O, who is a three year old, short-tailed cat, is the mother of PrincessContinue reading “Relative clauses and relative pronouns”

Indefinite articles again…

So why are there 2 indefinite articles? (You’re wondering) Well, that’s easy-ish… we use ‘a’ before adjectives or nouns whose first letter is a consonant and we use ‘an’ before adjectives or nouns whose first letter is a vowel. And if that was all there was to it, this would be the end of thisContinue reading “Indefinite articles again…”

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